Do humans live in the Andes?

Do humans live in the Andes?

The people of the Andes Mountains. Human presence in the Andes is relatively recent; the oldest human remains to be found are only 10,000 to 12,000 years old, although habitation probably dates to much earlier times.

How are humans impacting the Andes?

Population pressure and migration are deforestation drivers caused by the increasing need for new and greater areas for agricultural production and an increasing demand for food, water and energy by large populations in distant urban centers as well as in Amazonian communities.

Are the Andes mountains in Europe?

The Andes extend from north to south through seven South American countries: Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, and Argentina. ... The Andes Mountains are the highest mountain range outside Asia.

What are some interesting facts about the Andes Mountains?

The Andes are the world's highest mountain range outside of Asia. The average height of Andes Mountains is approximately 4,000 meters (13,000 feet). The highest elevation in the Andes is Mount Aconcagua in Argentina, which is 6,961 meters (22,838 feet) above sea level. It is the highest mountain outside Asia.

Why are the Andes important?

The Andes play a vital part in national economies, accounting for a significant proportion of the region's GDP, providing large agricultural areas, mineral resources, and water for agriculture, hydroelectricity (Figure 1), domestic use, and some of the largest business centres in South America.

Are the Andes bigger than the Rockies?

The Andes are the longest mountain range in the world, covering over 4,300 mi (7,000 km) in length! The Rocky Mountains are located in North America. They extend from New Mexico, northward through Canada, and into Alaska, covering roughly 3,000 mi (4,800 km) in length.

What is the longest mountain on Earth?

Andes

What type of rocks are found in the Andes Mountains?

The rocks run the gamut of sedimentary rocks, including: sandstones, siltstones, shales, limestones, and quartzites. Volumetrically and economically, Ordovician and Silurian shales and siltstones are probably the most important sequences (formed 500-440 million and 440-395 million years age, respectively).