What is the golden rule in Buddhism?

What is the golden rule in Buddhism?

“… hurt not others with what pains yourself.” (The Buddha, Udânavarga 5:18, trans. 1883:27). These selected quotations illustrate the moral principle, known as the Golden Rule, that we ought to treat other people as we want to be treated (Wattles 1996).

What is the golden rule of Islam?

Abstract: The ethics of reciprocity, known as the “golden rule,” is any moral dictum that encourages people to treat others the way they would like to be treated. ... The golden rule in Islamic traditions has been explicitly invoked by numerous Muslim leaders and organizations towards this end.

What is the golden rule of Taoism?

The Taoism's golden rule means not doing bad to others. But, it is a completely passive rule that speaks more to not being jealous or overly competitive than how you should actually treat your neighbor.

Can we not do others Golden Rule?

With the Golden rule you are to: Act as you would have others act towards you. The same essential golden rule has been taught by all the major religions (and philosophies) of the world going back approximately 3500 years. Do not to others what ye do not wish done to yourself... --This is the whole Dharma, heed it well.

What is the golden rule in school?

Building relationships with students begins first and foremost with the Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. This means to treat students respectfully, ask politely, and correct kindly.

Is the Golden Rule selfish?

The Golden Rule is used as a tool to direct the behavior of people towards an end that we assume is positive – if you want to be treated well, you should treat others well. But if we dig a bit deeper, we find that the Golden Rule is really selfish and not selfless.